Surveying the Survey: The Public Responds to the Research

LEESBURG, Fla. (June 29, 2013) Over the last month, stories discussing various aspects of the issue of Body Image Disturbance, as well as the proactive (preventative) and reactive (treatment) responses to the disorder have been presented and dissected. In response to these recent stories, readers were asked to complete a survey with questions exploring the following:

• Whether they have personal connection to eating disorders;
• How well they understood the research;
• What part of the discussion they wanted to know more about;
• What information they found the most interesting; and
• Whether their opinion changed after viewing the research.

Some of the key results are as indicated via wufoo.com reporting graphs shown below:

Additionally, several of the respondents found the data from two key info-graphics were the most interesting and included information that was new to them.

LEESBURG, Florida (June 2013) An info-graphic discussing the difference between men and women when it comes to eating disorders. (Graphic created by: Michelle Turner/Full Sail University).

LEESBURG, Florida (June 2013) An info-graphic discussing the difference between men and women when it comes to eating disorders. (Graphic created by: Michelle Turner/Full Sail University).

LEESBURG, Florida (June 2013) An info-graphic presenting various facts and figures relating to teens and eating disorders. (Graphic created by: Michelle Turner/Full Sail University).

LEESBURG, Florida (June 2013) An info-graphic presenting various facts and figures relating to teens and eating disorders. (Graphic created by: Michelle Turner/Full Sail University).

However, despite being presented with new and surprising facts and figures, there were a lot of points that readers wanted to see discussed in further detail.

• How the 10 million with eating disorders can be helped;
• The “why” of eating disorders;
• What is being done regarding eating disorders for all ages;
• Further exploration of early intervention and prevention programs;
• How the media / social media can play a roll in spreading a positive message;
• Further discussion of the male population that struggle with body image disturbance;
• Why having “curves” or not being skinny is viewed as negative;
• How the media could reverse the trends and do more PSA’s;
• Teaching children/ young people to be happy with their bodies.

While an effort will be made to further address many of these points in future research, readers are encouraged to take ownership of any and all of the points and seek out ways to help.

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